Berlin Panorama 2018The Silk and the Flame chronicles Yao's return from Beijing to his familial home in the provinces for the Chinese New Year. Nearing forty and still single, he returns to visit his deaf-mute mother and invalid father, whose dying wish is to see his son wedded to the right woman and starting a family of his own. Yao would prefer to find the right man. He has done well in the capital and supports his parents, his elder brother and his brother's children.  His professional achievements have earned his father's respect and fueled the family's growing dismay that he is still a bachelor.  Ever the dutiful son, he finds himself suppressing his own needs in order to meet their expectations. 

The film is an intimate look into everyday life in China, where the economic boom of the cities is in stark contrast to the poverty experienced by those living in the countryside, and the legacy of communist rule. Schiele uses stark black-and-white photography to provide a fascinating and subtle narrative that reveals how deeply entrenched the Confucian values that shape Chinese society are, the legacy of the social tumult of the twentieth century, and the family’s own battle with the simple means of communication that most of us take for granted. The film ultimately offers an intimate portrait of familial bonds, of duty verses desire, of the pressure to conform to expectations.

Among the precious few highlights screened in the Panorama section, Jordan Schiele’s The Silk and the Flame (2018) reminded us that documentary can be a vehicle for great storytelling. Yao, a Beijing resident nearing forty, returns to his home village for Chinese New Year to visit his deaf-mute mother and invalid father, whose dying wish is to see his son wed. Yao, however, is gay and has no plans on getting married. Rather than hammering out an ethical argument, Schiele uses stark black-and-white photography to evince a fascinating and subtle narrative that reveals how deeply entrenched all his subjects are in China’s tumultuous history of the past century, the Confucian values that shape that society, and their own battles with the simple means of communication that most of us take for granted.

Artforum

Like “Dressed for Pleasure”, “The Silk And The Flame” also explores the weight of parental pressure on younger generations who desire nothing more than to explore their own sexuality without fear of judgement. In this documentary, audiences meet a man called Yao who travels back from Beijing to his family’s village so that they can celebrate Chinese New Year together. While Jordan Schiele’s camera captures everyday life in rural China with fascinating insight, what stays with audiences long after the credits roll is how Yao selflessly puts aside his own needs to support his family, all while fending off their relentless need to see him settle down with a nice woman.

Sleek

Institutional Licensing Options

DVD with PPR: $349

DVD with Digital Site License: $499

DVD with Digital Site License + Public Performance Rights: $599

Institutional Licensing Options

To submit a purchase order, please send the details of your order (title and license option) along with billing/shipping address and PO number if applicable. To learn more about our Terms of Use, please click here.


USA 2018
Language: Mandarin, English
Documentary form
Duration: 87 min
Color: Black/White
Written and directed by Jordan Schiele
Director of Photography: Jordan Schiele
Editing: Jordan Schiele
Music: Wei-San Hsu
Sound Design: Chris Stanghroom
Sound: Li Feng
Production Manager: Zhao Xi
Producer: Jordan Schiele
Associate Producers: Liu Hui, He Tai